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education ends up coming down to money. money is the reason behind the latest and largest school closures in our nations history. chicago is closing 54 schools. can you imagine? it's an effort to shore up the billion dollar budget deficit. as shocking as this sounds, cities are facing similar meesures are in your city could be one of them. could this actually be the best medicine? joining me now is the ceo of the illinois policy institute. >> and the 2010 census, 200,000 africans left and that has been a decades long time. many are declaring that the chicago public school system, which has monopoly control over educational systems is failing. they are leaving. we have these empty schools that have to be closed. melissa: it seems a liitle too easy. some people have been saying that the schools are empty, they are curable schools, is they're not going to be overcrowding? >> chicago's population is in a long-term decline. we have the lowest population that we have had since 1920. it was built from hundreds of thousands of more people. all over the city there is excess capacity. they are movi
the crac, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how seriouous is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're really at the peak of their financial succs. they're making the most they e
99 weeks. these folks have been out of work two years, three, even four. they're college-educated professionals in their 40s or 50s, people who thought their company would take them all the way to retirement. vernon? >> i was very angry. i was very bitter. i was fed up with society, the corporate world, the lies, deceit, the greed. >> they don't look it, but they have fallen out of the middle class, turned in cars, gone on food stamps, taken kids out of college, and faced foreclosure. now, they've pinned their last hopes on joe carbone. >> the word "carnage" is a strong word, but i can't think of a better word in this case. and i-- what aggravates me is that there isn't outrage. we ought to be angry. we ought to be giving every moment of our time figuring out how we're gonna restore for them the american dream. >> joe carbone is president of something called the workplace. it's the state unemployment office in southwest connecticut where people get job training and placement help. carbone has a reputation for innovative job programs, but he has never seen so many people out of wor
-- lgbt community. the benefits and what is in play. outreach education and enrollment. you have to inform them of their choices and provide ways to help enroll new coverage where it is available. scaling of the workforce is how we can help with this. how will the care be monitored, and medicaid expansion decisions, health insurance exchanges and ultimately the future of ryan white. i will wrap up now and review of some of these thoughts with what the panel has to say. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, for that thoughtful overview. we are going to move now to our panel discussion. our moderator this morning is the advisor for lgbt policy and racial justice and director of the fire initiative that explores the impact of public policy on gay and transgender people of color. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for providing a great overview for us on how this benefits lgbt people and people living with hiv. includes the principles of universal design. some are marginalized among us and we are helping to work to get a system that works for everyone. we are we're going to talk about what we
a better education than you. and in fact, the reverse is happening. women entering the work force are often better educated, with more academic and trade certifications than men who are doing it. and women are also doing hard and dangerous jobs. we can look to what they do in the military. they can look at how we see them as firefighters and police officers and prison guards. under the legislative i am proposing, no longer will women be on their own and fighting for equal pay or for equal work. in this country, we say work hard and play by the rules, you'll get ahead. we work hard every day but we find that the rules are different for women and for men. actually, the rules in many workplaces are rigged against us. so, mr. president, i would hope that we would pass my amendment today that would allow us to be able to go forward later on in the year and pass paycheck fairness. it is important to the women in the workplace and it's important to our economy. much is being said here about being pro growth. who isn't pro growth? of course we want to grow our economy. and if we look at the tax str
's for cancer or paving roads or education or any other worthy project, there's going to be less money if we don't address the spending problem. particularly if we don't address mandatory spending. and i ask them: have you looked to do what every family has had to do, what every business has had to do during this four years of tepid growth and coming out of this recession, which just seems to linger and linger and linger. 23 million people out of work. have you looked at ways in which you can make your spending and your administration of the budget which you oversee, can you make that more efficient and more effective? are there things you can cut? are there programs you can eliminate that no longer are effective or perhaps shouldn't have been there in the first place? are there things that you would like to do but without the resources, you're not able to do at this time, so you have to set them aside? so if the family is faced with lower revenue or dad is, his job, his salary has been cut or mom has lost her second job or for whatever reason they're having a hard time making payments -- educat
the educator teaches by collaboration rather than by instruction. woman: is it dark in there? hello. i'm joanne hendrick, author of the whole child and your guide to this video series. in this program, we're going to look at what we call cognitive development and what we can do to enhance our children's ability to think, reason, remember information, and solve problems. we'll observe children in a number of different programs-- head start, family day-care homes, university schools, and private child-care centers-- and we'll listen to their teachers as they describe some of the methods they use to enhance their children's learning. what's in there? what is that? [bell jingling] what is it? what is it? is it a sponge? hendrick: the foundations of learning begin right here because children begin to learn right from the start. the most important thing i believe we can teach our children, no matter what their age, is that they are valued. hi. hi. hi, sweetie. oh, no! ♪ one wheel's off, and the axle's broken ♪ ♪ one wheel's off, the axle's broken ♪ ♪ one wheel's off, the axle's broken ♪
to them. >> a lot to them if you're trying to piece together a college education, not large in terms of the big picture, but because of the sequester, the department of education said that these grants are cut and new grants are cut by 38% across the board. anytime a new grant if it was $5,000 before, it's about $2,000 less than that. >> greta: here is what i don't get. this is almost 40% cut. and 38% cut. explain if the sequester was 2.4% cut across the board, why are the young people taking it at 38%, this cut? how, i would think they would have 2.4%. two things going on the. one it's spread over a shorter period of time. we're halfway into the fiscal year so that 2.4% cut has to actually go into effect over a shorter period of time. >> greta: make it 4.8 or 4.8 then. >> the other thing, there are things in the sequester that are called off making sure the men and women in afghanistan and iraq themselves aren't in harm's way. and vast majority of military spending not cut. so when there are programs that are targeted they take the disproportionate chunk of the hit and that's the po
she's tried to influence the education policy and i enjoy talking with her and even more so the older sister who had gone to india to become involved with children who would not have had an education and all the issues related to that. i thought this was interesting and worst doing so i decided the best option was to offer myself to become a nun so at the age of 17 i spoke to the reverend mother to say i decided to become a nun. she said think about it. go away for a year then be will receive you. my parents were very happy with my choice because i honored to be a nun and they're happy to have me another year. they decided nothing was too good for their daughter said they thought they would send me to paris for one year. [laughter] that changed everything. [laughter] i describe that in detail in the book. [laughter] and they came under a different influence. i had a grandfather retired earlier and what he practiced with the pork guy against the landlord and he was pleased to have a young girl who was interested in what he was talking about. he did not know how to speak to a child and
and medicare and interest on the debt. all the cuts that are coming are .oming out of education it is hurting the economy. you have got to come up with the plan to came the growth of entitlements -- to tame the growth of the entitlements. >> i am very intuitive could i have the sense that charles is exasperated by what you said. >> pardon me, charles. >> he has been in office for a term and three months. he knows what the problem is. he is not a stupid man. he spoke about this openly in 2010, saying that medicaid is unsustainable and the cuts at the edges are not going to work one. what evan is asking, i suspect that he is exasperated, too, is why hasn't he done anything? the only reason he is doing the charm offensive is to manage the poll numbers. >> i think the democrats are a big problem for him. they do not want to change social security. social security was started at a time when life expectancy was 65 years old. >> it seems that all is good begin with our foundational document as the constitution, and the second man and says the right to bear arms shall not be infringed. >> i have stud
that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african americans feel welcomed in this city. so, where do we go from here? we start to make aggressive efforts to educate our young people. we take ownership of our community. we take ownership of our children. we support each other instead of pointing the finger. where do we go from here? (applause) >> there is much work to do. as supervisor cohen and i cannot do it alone, we need your support. we need your encoura
society and educated -- and education, which are the severely handicapped people who are in severe poverty. >> he makes a very good point about helping disabled people across the world. we should make sure that the framework we look up properly includes the people he says. on the wider issue of the budget, i know it's contentious. i know it's difficult to i believe we should break a promise we made to the poorest people in our world. and i would also say, to those who have their doubts come of course, there is a strong moral case for a budget, but there is also a national security case. it is remarkable that broken countries, countries affected by conflict, they have not met a single millennium goal between them. by helping to mend these entries, often by security work and aid work am i we can help them. >> in 1997, there were no excess deaths at staffordshire hospital. it was an until 2002 that there were 20 excess deaths. labor health secretary after liver health secretary did nothing. in total, 1197 excess deaths occurred. some of them were asians who died in their own feces -- some of
for no. 2 and this is the third or fourth year in a row that the quality of public education came out no. 2 and i think when people talk about small business issue, they don't think about that one. no. 3, no surprise, regulations. no. 4, taxation. no. 5, this is another one that i find can kind of interesting. last year it was actually no. 4, but infrastructure. small businesses are concerned about infrastructure, and it's been borne out again by the survey. as far as some of the interesting specifics of the respondents, 48% provide health insurance, 52% did not provide health insurance. interestingly enough and maybe i will talk a little bit more, 74% almost had never heard of the small business tax credit. 63% had never talked to their state senator. their assembly person or to the governor, which i think is a little scary and it's something that hopefully you as a commissioner will re[tpo-rpbs/] that we reinforce to our representatives. those who did need capital 2:1 and those who couldn't get capital versus those who can't get capital. so it's clearly a problem for those who need i
education and with legislative and regulatory agency. we provide formal and informal advice to the city of san francisco and in support of this implementation program, they set up a process where sea members. in this regard we have established a working group to participate in the implementation development of the soft frame retrofit ordinance. this working group of structural engineers have met to discuss the aspects of the ordinance. as part of this discussion the group has developed and endorses the following statements of support for the ordinance. supports the city of county of san francisco's effort to reduce risk through a comprehensive program such as thatten visioned by the safety implementation program and -- can be effective towards risk reduction goals and we'll continue to develop technical criteria appropriate for the ordinances purpose and intent. we will also continue to support the city's implementation of the ordinance through education and guidance of engineers and other stake holders. we look forward to continue our relationship with the county and city of san franc
the reauthorization of proposition h or the public education enrichment fund and the children's fund, is that right? >> that's correct, supervisor. we certainly discussed what made the most sense to assume, but given the significant interest and the importance of both of those funds, we assumed that both of them would be reauthorized and to the degree that they were -- if they were not to be reauthorized, that would change the projection. >> and given how voters of overwhelmingly supported the children's fund and prop h over the years, hopefully that's a good assumption. there is an amount of money that as the trigger has been pulled for the public education enrichment funds that i think is over 100 million and i know a couple of my colleagues said that amount should be paid back to the school district, but can you explain how prop h operates and if it's recuperates, we don't have to pay that back to the school district. >> so, the way the charter works is if proposition h were not renewed or reauthorized, then the city would owe -- would be required to repay all of the amounts that it had deferred
is the foundation of your case and you have to go in there and do that to educate the jury and to educate the judge. a lot of these people and the judge have never been in front and had to deal with a gravanis type case. the information should be consistent. you have defense attorneys that start going through 2 or 3 our 4 cases and they hear the same thing and they hear somebody professing to be an expert and this guy does not know, it puts a big hole in his expertise right off so we wanted to have something consistent. now, if you properly present this information, it will easily establish the officer as a credible expert and at that point you can start rendering expert decisions. trainings that you go to should be set up in such a way that every jurisdiction has an expert. sometimes you have to piggyback on somebody else's expertise while you learn, but there's no reason that every jurisdiction can't have an expert in gravanis and that's going to come in handy when he's talking to city hall people about allocation of resources, to his department about allocation of resources, when he decides h
that is required by formula. the public education services baseline, we need to maintain the level of funding that was provided to the school during the years during that 6.7 million and then here are the amounts for the public education enrichment fund. so, taken together, all of these baselines amount to 450 million dollars of discretionary funds. and then similar to those baselines, we have others that are specified to be certain percentages of certain taxes, so you have parking tax and property tax are the ones, so mta receives 80% of parking tax in lieu, and what that means is that the parking tax comes into the general fund and we give mta general fund money in the same dollar amount, so that amounts to 61 million dollars, similarly with the library, 2.5% of property tax, this is an additional 37 million, open space, 37 million, the children's fund of 44.7 million, the municipal symphony, 2 million, and then the hotel tax as we discussed earlier, 88 million that is then budgeted, 56 million of that is budgeted in the general fund. >> so, the open space fund is getting an additional 37 m
in the workplace. your reaction? > > my reaction is that these are very privileged women, highly educated, with many opportunities. i do not believe that they are an expression of women today. most people say, in terms of marissa mayer, that, if you want productivity, you let people work from home because they have more time, more energy and more flexibility; and if you want innovation, then you bring them all together. and i think a combination of those two things is the best way to support an institution, a culture, and a business. on the other hand, i am very concerned about it. i think the issue is that women are empowered. we do not- > sandberg you are talking about? > > yes. we do not get our power from men, we do not get our power from others, we do not have to accommodate or manipulate to become empowered. we do have the education, we have the experience, we have the knowledge, and we are empowered. so i believe that i am in opposition to the position of both of those two women. > let me ask you about sexism. there is blatant sexism in countries such as india or afghanistan- > > a
. >>> an american educated i.t >>> 300,000 people have celebrating with the new pope. he says he will lead a humble church that will help the poor. the followers for in the square, and he was elected last week by a secret conclave of cardinals. he then entered st. peter's basilica. he received the ring known as the fisherman's ring. it bears the image of st. peter holding two keys. he called on economic and social leaders to protect the people and the environment. pope francis indicated he will build a closer relationship with followers, raising expectations for reform within the catholic church. >>> an american educated i.t. manager will become the prime minister for the opposition in syria. ghassan hitto lived in the u.s. for decades but now he will govern parts of syria controlled by rebel forces. members of the syrian national coalition met in istanbul, turkey. they voted to elect hitto who moved to turkey last year to help coordinate the opposition. the coalition plans to launch an interim government for northern syria which is under rebel control. 70,000 syrians have died in two years of figh
been working closely with many of our partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligati
to an education. taliban extremists shot her in the head. since then, she has been receiving treatment in birmingham. >> at 15, she has already seized responsibility, taking her fight for education to the world stage. there's even talk of a nobel peace prize. concerns today, her are those of every other british teenager. it is all about making friends. she is doing her best. >> she herself wants to be a normal teenage girl and to have the support of other girls around her. i think that is something she has very much missed during her time in hospital. >> she will enter in your 9 -- year 9. >> today, tens of thousands of people filled st. peter's square for the first public mass of pope francis. the newly installed pontiff said out his priorities and thrilled the crowd, riding around in an open vehicle. our correspondent has the story. >> he wants his pontificate to be marked by humility, to be a pope close to the people, so gone are the bullet through screens that would separate him from the masses. he mary's the authority of the papacy with the informal spontaneity of a parish priest
in that process. >> 18 reasons was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that
. the story from our chief education correspondent rehema ellis. >> we want to go straight. >> reporter: this may look like an outing for a boating club, but it's a public school gym class. >> keep going! >> you have to use your arms and it also helps you move your legs, too. >> you live longer, stay healthy. >> everything's fun. >> reporter: in miami dade county where 14% of middle school students are obese, there is a new approach to physical education. catering to kids' interests. >> i like the bikes. that's my favorite. >> reporter: to get them up, moving and healthy. >> we are seeing kids over weight losing an average of eight pounds a semester. kids with eating disorders are putting on an average of two pounds a semester. >> reporter: despite strained finances for gym programs, no money turned out to be no problem. why? nearly a decade ago the school district's phys ed director enlisted the help of parents, the principal and superintendents and began raising money. >> we have been able to secure outside grant money, community resources. >> reporter: a school without a gym turned a
programs through her church. [speaker not understood] received her education from oakwood college and california university where she obtained a master's degree in psychology. ms.felder started in the city as a clerk with child crisis and worked her way up to management, to the management level and is now the director of the city's integrated response system. she has demonstrated exemplary leadership, administratively and in the field. she is well loved by her staff as you can tell, and lead her staff by example, working with a team and not above them. she has a hands-on -- she's a hand on manager who doesn't just sit behind her desk, but works closely with her team. and directly with victims and their loved ones. she believes that mental health services need to be brought directly to communities. she is proactive in setting her team to neighborhoods with the greatest need for behavioral health services to engage the community through activities and to build the relationships and trust so that those who may need services and support can be more open to seek the help that they need
the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family institute on line and platform for good a couple days ago. anne was there for the launch in
go out and the inner track is most abused for all obvious reasons i would like to be educated if there are designs there can be incremental changes because much of the track doesn't seem to be severe but those that are make it impossible to make it a good track. i think it's in terrible shape givens those shots and i appreciate the comments from the public. i have to believe there is something shofert $2 million to make it a first class track and if it isn't i would like to be educated why not. thanks. >> excuse me. we are now are item four which is general public comment up to 15 minutes. at this time members of the public may address the commission on items of interest to the public that are within the subject matter jurisdiction of the commission, and that do not appear on the agenda. with respect to agenda items your opportunity to address the commission will be afforded when the item is reached in the meeting. please as a note remember this is for 15 minutes only and as i said earlier we had general public comment continued on item 10 so if your name isn't called th
. they are affecting their ability to continue with their employment, education or family responsibilities. so the center on criminal justice would advocate for an increased use or implementation of pretrial services at the local level and some on this panel will speak with more detail on that. >> let me ask miss dewint that you are obviously part of the bail association and the president of the organization, you have decades of experience. critics have argued that your association and other associations like it use their influence by way of lobbying to protect the groups financial interest. i'm wondering if you can respond to that and perhaps give us an idea what kind of lobbying your organization does? >> thank you. first of all let me thank jeff and the san francisco public defenders office for this 10th year of the justice submit summit. thank you and i don't have a prepared speech. i do want to address some of these misconceptions. there is a bail reform and we are part of the reform. we are proud to say that we are part of our regulatory agency with the department of insurance to reest
will be open for service in late 2014. >> tonight the california department of education is expabding it's list of recommended reading for kindergarten through 12th grade including works dealing with sexual identity issues. >> the state has been unable to update it's reading list until this week. >> california department of education just updated it's list of more than 7800 recommended books meant to prepare students for college. included are winners of the stone wall book awards. >> it's good to teach kids we're all people and will be accepted for who we are. it's great to see books being recommended. >> from young kids books, celebrating gay rights leader harvey filk to books for older kids. and totally joe. >> there is a war, a sexual war. >> social conservatives say such topics have no place on the state official reading list. >> your children are not being taught rigorous academics they're being taught social engineering that will hurt them physically and emotionally. >> the new book titles are recommended and the state insists they're not chosen because of their lgbt themes its not based
on education and awareness but it's not enough. we need direct services. we need to raise our voices and bush congress and let them know that the united states must recommit to putting resources to ending trafficking. and comprehensive immigration reform. and statewide. we should continue to fight for legislation like the domestic worker to live rights of other things that promote marginalization of our clients. at the end of the day and work with survivors we need to understand and listen and let them know that the work goes on. i want to thank -- a personal mentor. she has really been a mentor; she challenges us and says we are not powerless. what about ...? that is the question we should always ask ourselves. thank you. (applause) >> thank you again to mayor ed lee who has to leave and catch a plane. thank you. (applause) now i would like to call on supervisor carmen chu who has been fantastic and is been really outspoken; she has spoken so often and so well. it is a pleasure to have you here. >> supervisor chu: i want to thank nancy, and the department, and the commission. i want
health professionals to parents and educators, in an effort named at preventing more tragedies like this. >> jon: the president there reacting to the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school. one key item in his plan, the ban on assault weapons. that ended this week after harry reid dropped the ban from any legislation. so, jim, you didn't get a lot of coverage on that in the media. >> well, on cnn on thursday, you got a certain amount of oh, hand wringing, it's so terrible. the end of everything in terms of this issue. and you're struck by the contrast that news thursday was covered and the flip for the president in last year. talks about mental health parents, educators and the pl panoply of things you might do. and so adam lanza the killer there, and sort of fallen out of the picture and the things have become gone control. the at media is so focused, john holmes, right about a the lot of things, converted to islam, and in terms of what was going on with him. the only thing they want, define as justice for newtown is gun control up or down. >> jon: we'll get to you in a second, judy. r
. i learned a lot and educated myself a lot. the human beiody is just amazin. if it weren't for the blood i wouldn't be here. if it weren't for those donors i wouldn't be here. over a hundred units. >> over 300 donors. that's part of the reason you're back now. >> it is. >> what do you say? >> oh, my gosh. >> they gave you a chance at life. >> i can want wait to hug and kiss them and just look in their eyes. i have always wanted to know what their personalities are like, too. i'm serious. i pray for them and i think about them a lot. >> how big a problem is it? obviously enough people aren't donating blood. what's the shortfall? >> i don't think people are thinking about it. world blood donorer day is in june. it's this summer. so people's schedules are busy. they're not thinking about going and giving blood. it's a generational thing. my mom is part of the gallon club. my dad. their parents before. it's almost missed a generation. i think we need to talk about it more. we need to make it a family group thing. you never know when your life can change in a matter of minutes
would say that the, well, actually that's my sector of education, for example, education sector and all sorts of service sectors and of course the agriculture should be deviated. i wouldn't say that's, you know, we don't need any regulation. that's too far, but what we need is a right regulation and so far i think that what we need is more deregulation rather than regulation. >> fujimaki sees no easy road ahead for japan's economy, but he says there will be creation after destruction. what do you think is needed to prop up japan's economy now? >> unfortunately there is no way i think. i kept saying that weak yen would be very helpful to japanese economies. if the japanese government has taken easy policies, maybe japanese economy think about drastically already but unfortunately the last ten years accumulated debt increased substantially, maybe three times in the last 15 years. so they can't make a budget. so it means that it makes bankruptcy, accelerates the bankruptcy of japan i think. >> so there's no future for japan? >> no, it's -- yes -- no and yes. i mean i like to say that we ha
. >> the teachers do not teach in class. cannot pay,children so they don't learn in class. the education is like wasted time. >> this person does not work for any international organization. he is one of the many individuals who provide services to local communities. he made the decision 12 years ago. he thought he had a well-paid job in the oil industry. when he became infected with hiv and his wife died of aids, his life was turned upside down. today, the children are getting a special lesson. two women from switzerland are staying in the guest house. they have agreed to spend time with the children. and -- them is a primary school teacher. it is a chance for the youngsters to learn some english. >> i like blue. >> the school has benefited from the political changes in myanmar. until recently, they have only offer the occasional weekend class. private schools were outlawed under the military regime, but that ban has been overturned. now they want to open a proper school at a regular timetable. the building is well under way. forill have enough space 300 pupils. he is impatient about getting bu
that address matters of elementary and secondary education, a formative action in higher education, and equal educational opportunity. he is also the reason why sarah was able to say such nice tings about me because he was my supervisor when i was there and taught me everything that i know. he will discuss issues of racial equality, growing rights and speeches in "the year of the turtle." our second speaker is peter nicholas. he is a officer of lot the. -- at the university of washington school of law. prior to pursuing in the law, professor nicholas was a research economist at the university of michigan and served as a member of the ann arbor city council. he will discuss the speeches and the current battles over gay rights, same-sex marriage, the gay minority and the gay minority in the leaders of the african american community. we have the professor of law at armored law school. before her ointment, she was a tenured professor at the university of pennsylvania law school. and she worked in the civil rights commission at the united states department of justice and headed the voting rights p
made possible by the u.s. department of education captioned by the caption center wgbh educational foundation >>> next on "abc 7 news" at 9:00. city of san francisco quick response to an overnight club shooting. also the dramatic 911 call after a mother says two teens shot her toddler. a man falsely convict of a crime [ wind howling ] [ female announcer ] it balances you... [ water crashing ] ...it fills you with energy... and it gives you what you are looking for to live a more natural life. in a convenient two bar pack. this is nature valley... delicious granola bars made with the best ingredients in nature. nature valley. nature at its most delicious. >>> inside the 330 rich nightclub the shooting started early this morning and up to the street to the brannon street parking lot. first shot was fired at 1:15. for her safety she did not want to go on camera. >> they were fighting and shooting and running. we sat down by somebody's humer. >> the shooting went on for a while. >> for about 15 minutes. 15 minutes long, nonstop. consistently shooting. >> first tire was flattened by a b
. for me, right now, the most important thing is about educating and locking arms with people so they don't say, what can i do? theyt people to know what can do and feel empowered and realize how much power they do have to say something. to speak up for somebody. and hopefully, with -- what the symbol is, i think the breast cancer analogy is so beautiful to me. when i see, breast cancer used to be a thing -- don't talk about that. now, you see people wearing the pink ribbon, and i always feel like -- rockstar. they are so proud. you see somebody that survived rest cancer and you want to jump on the bandwagon and support. you look at them differently and admire them and they are so empowered. whether it is breast cancer, are all the different things, once you have survived it, you are empowered. these's unify around issues and make it something so we stopped blaming other people and taking responsibility. this morning listening to vice president biden, he said if a woman runs across the field naked, you can arrest her for indecent exposure. but that does that give you the right to rape her
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